Hold a Pink Ribbon fundraiser this October and feel the power of pink

The Power of pink: Get your family and friends together to help raise vital funds to support those affected by breast and gynaecological cancers. Photo - Shutterstock.
The Power of pink: Get your family and friends together to help raise vital funds to support those affected by breast and gynaecological cancers. Photo - Shutterstock.

October is Australia's Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Cancer Council's Pink Ribbon campaign aims to raise awareness about breast and gynaecological cancers, as well as raise funds for prevention programs, support services and vital cancer research.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Australian women, and every day, about 54 Australian women will receive this diagnosis.

While a woman diagnosed today has a 90 per cent chance of surviving for at least five years, every day, about eight Australian women die from breast cancer.

Cancer Council is encouraging us to hold a Pink Ribbon fundraiser and raise funds to help create a future free from breast cancer.

Helen Van Nooten, Campaigns Lead at Cancer Council NSW is encouraging the community to host an event:

"We're asking Aussie's to inspire family, friends and colleagues by hosting a Pink event, whether it be a picnic in the park or a virtual afternoon tea and show just how powerful pink can be."

"Pink Ribbon fundraisers give locals the power to change the lives of those affected by breast cancer.

"In the last 10 years, Cancer Council NSW has invested over $9.1 million into breast cancer research, continuing to investigate the most effective ways to reduce the impact of breast cancer."

To register your event visit www.doitforcancer.com.au/feelthepowerofpink.

The symptoms

Breast cancer is the abnormal growth of the cells lining the breast lobules or ducts.

These cells grow uncontrollably and have the potential to spread to other parts of the body.

According to the Cancer Council, some people have no symptoms and the cancer is found during a screening mammogram or a physical examination by a doctor.

The Cancer Council says symptoms could include:

  • new lumps or thickening in the breast or under the arm
  • nipple sores or nipple discharge or turning in
  • a change in the size or shape of the breast
  • skin of the breast dimpling
  • ongoing pain that is not related to your normal menstrual cycle and occurs only in one breast
  • rash or red swollen breasts.

Free screening

Don't forget women aged between 50 and 74 can access free screening mammograms every two years via the BreastScreen Australia Program.

Women aged 40-49 and 75 and over are also eligible to receive free mammograms, however, they do not receive an invitation to attend.

It is recommended that women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, aged between 40 and 49 or over 75 discuss options with their GP, or contact BreastScreen Australia on 13 20 50.

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