MidCoast Council has approved the DA

MidCoast Council has given its approval to the construction of a fuel and take-away centre along the Pacific Highway, Coolongolook.
MidCoast Council has given its approval to the construction of a fuel and take-away centre along the Pacific Highway, Coolongolook.

A development application (DA) to construct a service station at Coolongolook has been given the green light.

MidCoast Council approved the DA at its June ordinary monthly meeting.

The proposed four bowser site, on the corner of Bengal (Pacific Highway) and King streets, will include a covered refuelling area, convenience store and take-away food and drink area.

The proposed development has met all the provisions under the Great Lakes Local Environmental Plan 2014 (LEP) and complies with all the relevant controls that apply to the site. 

Council received more than 35 submissions from adjoining property owners and business operators during the 30-days the proposed development was on public display.

Concerns included additional traffic turning on and off the highway, noise from air-brakes, proximity to the underpass, pollution, school children safety, over representation of service stations, conflict with Salty Dog premises, waste disposal, fear of increased accidents, appearance and loss of town character.

According acting planning and natural systems director, Paul De Szell, the proposed $1.8 million project would have significant local benefits during and after construction providing local jobs and giving motorists another service station option.

“The proposed development is considered to be consistent with the broader public interest,” Mr De Szell said.

“The proposed development has been assessed in accordance with the provisions of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and Regulations and is permissible with development consent.” 

Mr De Szell said the application had been referred to the RMS and their comments have been considered during the assessment process with recommended conditions applied.

According to the RMS, provision of highway service centres encourages drivers to 'stop, revive, survive'. They provide opportunities for drivers to take breaks when they recognise the warning signs of fatigue, which contributes significantly to travel safety and efficiency.