A Yarning Circle opens to students with a smoking ceremony

An indigenous Yarning Circle has been built in the grounds of Nabiac Public School to be used as a learning space for students to share stories and knowledge in a relaxed environment. A smoking ceremony opened it to the school.

Students Beau Newell, Mia Crump, Kenzie Eason and Tamara Roberts make their way past the Circle during the smoking ceremony.

Students Beau Newell, Mia Crump, Kenzie Eason and Tamara Roberts make their way past the Circle during the smoking ceremony.

Aboriginal liaison officers Jye Simon performed the ceremony with June Farr, local elders Susan Poulton and Judy Kirby.

Aboriginal liaison officers Jye Simon performed the ceremony with June Farr, local elders Susan Poulton and Judy Kirby.

The school's indigenous students helped build the Yarning Circle for a relaxed learning space, digging holes and using timber donated by local parents Guy and Kim Page.

The school's indigenous students helped build the Yarning Circle for a relaxed learning space, digging holes and using timber donated by local parents Guy and Kim Page.

Darcie Potts waves the smoke past the Yarning Circle as he walks the full circle along with students from the school.

Darcie Potts waves the smoke past the Yarning Circle as he walks the full circle along with students from the school.

Kindergarten teacher Karlie Brock leads students through the ceremony, which was attended by students and indigenous elders.

Kindergarten teacher Karlie Brock leads students through the ceremony, which was attended by students and indigenous elders.

Embracing the moment, grandmother Mrs Potts embraces her role within the greater school community and with future generations.

Embracing the moment, grandmother Mrs Potts embraces her role within the greater school community and with future generations.

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